Dry Cleaning

At present, a Cleaner will take care of your Garments through two types of garment cleaning: wet cleaning and dry cleaning. Dry cleaning is appropriate for delicate fabrics and other clothes that cannot be washed by water. Dry cleaning is a way to clean dirt and stains by using a solvent instead of water. This is a very efficient technique to get rid of fatty stains, without changing the garment shape and altering the texture and the color of the fabric materials. Dry cleaning is less successful for washing dirt that is easily soluble in water.
As stated in previous answer, Dry cleaning is appropriate for delicate fabrics and other clothes that cannot be washed by water and it uses fluids to remove soil and stains from fabric. It has the ability to dissolve greases and oils in a way that water cannot. Dry cleaning helps to return garments to a "like-new" condition using precautions to prevent shrinkage, loss of color, and fabric distortion.
Today, the solvent used by almost 90% of all dry cleaners is perchloroethylene, commonly known as "perc." It is completely non-flammable and non-combustible, of relatively low toxicity, and can be efficiently reused and recycled.
Wet cleaning is the practice of removing soils from garments and other textile items through the use of water and additives (such as detergent) and using precautions to avoid shrinkage, loss of color, and fabric distortion.
Particular detergents, additives, and finishes sets commercial laundering apart from home laundering. This process enables your cleaner to offer unvarying quality shirts at reasonable prices.

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